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How to Preserve Dandelion for Later Use
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Post How to Preserve Dandelion for Later Use
Originally posted by Kelee:
How to Preserve Dandelion for Later Use

The aerial part of the dandelion is better preserved by freezing because it retains more of its medicinal value when frozen rather than dried.
The entire dandelion can be preserved and used at a later date. The most common use of dandelion is preparation of coffee or tea. You can harvest dandelion in the spring for use throughout the year.

Harvesting
The aerial part of the dandelion, or part which grows above the ground, include the leaves, stem, and flower. It is generally advised that these parts be gathered while the dandelion is small because the taste of the leaves and stem is less bitter at this stage. This is of more importance when the dandelion leaves and stem are to be used fresh for salads. While small, fresh dandelions are a spring treat; the larger dandelions can be collected and preserved for making teas at a later date.

Freezing
The aerial part of the dandelion is better preserved by freezing because it retains more of its medicinal value when frozen rather than dried. If you have a preference for the flowers, leaves or stem you can separate and preserve only these parts. However, it isn't necessary. The parts can be frozen together. Rinse the leaves and flowers well. Set them on a towel to dry. Tear them into small pieces prior to freezing if they are to be used for tea.


http://www.suite101.com/content/how-to- ... z1S0c19j6y



Dandelion
Overview:

While many people think of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) as a pesky weed, herbalists consider it a valuable herb with many culinary and medicinal uses. Dandelion is a rich source of vitamins A, B complex, C, and D, as well as minerals such as iron, potassium, and zinc. Its leaves are often used to add flavor to salads, sandwiches, and teas. The roots can be found in some coffee substitutes, and the flowers are used to make certain wines.

In traditional medicine, dandelion roots and leaves were used to treat liver problems. Native Americans also used dandelion decoctions (liquid made by boiling down the herb in water) to treat kidney disease, swelling, skin problems, heartburn, and stomach upset. Chinese medicinal practitioners traditionally used dandelion to treat digestive disorders, appendicitis, and breast problems (such as inflammation or lack of milk flow). In Europe, herbalists incorporated it into remedies for fever, boils, eye problems, diabetes, and diarrhea.

Today, dandelion roots are mainly used as an appetite stimulant, digestive aid, and for liver and gallbladder function. Dandelion leaves are used as a diuretic to stimulate the excretion of urine.

http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/dandelion-000236.htm

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Thu Jul 14, 2011 7:18 am
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